Language Liquidation

9 May

In his novel Notes from the Underground, Dostoevsky creates a landscape in space free from attachment to time and tenses. The unique time horizon in Underground allows for a natural flow and discussion of ideas that need not be in a a logical sequences of cause and consequential effect. I wonder if escaping from a world with a linear time horizon is in fact a way outside of the world of intentions, enabling a discussion of intention without defining it by itself. 

Chasing the tail of lingering curiosity, I want to continue my engagement in a philosophical discourse with infinite room to discuss all that is the sublime and the beautiful. The dissonance between what I mean and what I say, and what I say and what I mean, is open air for error and I hope to tighten and eventually achieve a bound entity within (from between) them. This process must be slow or it is not meaningful….Where I stand today, I am befuddled by words.

Clumsily, I continue to grasp at thin air hoping to pull what I mean out of the vapid, vacuous knowledge of how I have known its verbalization. To start, I would like to clarify the self-depreicating connotations in ‘clumsy’; the nature of clumsy here is not the effect of carelessness, but rather, courage to cultivate and initiate a journey towards seeking. As is the case with most processes, what is not shaky will inevitably become increasingly strong footed and confident.  Moreover,  words themselves already are prone to wobble, in part because they no longer have the connotations and denotations that rests in their etymological origins.

Through liquidating language, an intentional sublimation of words as I know them today , in their solid, crystalised forms, I can come closer to knowing the sublime and the beautiful. An ideological improvization:

On The World of Art: “…It was, as Benois himself admitted, ‘not this, that or the other in isolation, but everything together.'”

Crepuscular |krəˈpəskyələr|

adjective
of, resembling, or relating to twilight.

  • Zoology (of an animal) appearing or active in twilight.
  • ORIGIN mid 17th cent.: from Latin crepusculum ‘twilight’ + -ar 1 .
  • Crepuscular is a term used to describe some animals that are primarily active during twilight, that is at dawn and at dusk.[1] The word is derived from the Latin word crepusculum, meaning “twilight.”[1] Crepuscular is thus in contrast with diurnal and nocturnal behavior. Crepuscular animals may also be active on a bright moonlit night. Many animals that are casually described as nocturnal are in fact crepuscular.[2] Within the definition of crepuscular are the terms matutinal (or “matinal”) and vespertine, denoting species active in the dawn and dusk respectively.
  • The crepuscular mood of Russia’s fin de siecle  is reflected more powerfully than in Chagall’s Mirror of 1915, one of the most trenchant works of his Russian years.

trenchant |ˈtren ch ənt|
adjective

  • 1 vigorous or incisive in expression or style : she heard angry voices, not loud, yet certainly trenchant.
  • 2 archaic or poetic/literary (of a weapon or tool) having a sharp edge : a trenchant blade.
  • DERIVATIVES
  • trenchancy |- ch ənsē| |ˈtrɛntʃənsi| noun ( in sense 1) .
  • trenchantly |ˈtrɛntʃəntli| adverb ( in sense 1) .
  • ORIGIN Middle English (sense 2) : from Old French, literally ‘cutting,’ present participle of trenchier (see trench ).
woman
noun
  • ORIGIN Old English wīfmon, -man (see wife , man ), a formation peculiar to English, the ancient word being wife .
  • 1 a woman got out of the car lady, girl, female; matron; Scottish lass, lassie; informal chick, girlie, sister, dame, broad, gal; grrrl; literary maid, maiden, damsel; archaic wench, gentlewoman; (women) womenfolk
  • 2 he found himself a new woman girlfriend, sweetheart, partner, significant other, inamorata, lover, mistress; fiancée; wife, spouse; informal missus, better half, main squeeze, squeeze, babe, baby; dated lady friend, lady love.

Serpentine: serpentine   (sûr’pən-tēn’, -tīn’)

  • Any of a group of greenish, brownish, or yellowish monoclinic minerals, occurring in igneous or metamorphic rocks. They are used as a source of magnesium and asbestos. Chemical formula: (Mg,Fe)3Si2O5(OH)4.
  • ser·pen·tine   (sûr’pən-tēn’, -tīn’)    adj.  Of or resembling a serpent, as in form or movement; sinuous. Subtly sly and tempting.n.   (-tēn’) Any of a group of greenish, brownish, or spotted minerals, Mg3Si2O5(OH)4, used as a source of magnesium and asbestos, and in architecture as a decorative stone.[Middle English, from Old French serpentin, from Late Latin serpentīnus, from Latin serpēns, serpent-, serpent; see serpent.]

sin·u·ous  (sny-s) adj.

  • Characterized by many curves or turns; winding: a sinuous stream. Characterized by supple and lithe movements: the sinuous grace of a dancer. Not direct; devious. Sinuate: a sinuous leaf.[From Latin sinusus, from sinus, curve.]
  • sinuous [ˈsɪnjʊəs] adj; full of turns or curves; intricate; devious; not straightforward ; supple; lithe Also sinuate
  • [from Latin sinuōsus winding, from sinus a curve]Prodigal, pushing moral and esthetical boundaries, prodigal,  curvy, founded in nature,
  • International, interdisciplinary effecting ballet, art, thought etc
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