Tag Archives: News

Control of rodent motor cortex with an optical neural interface

6 Aug

Control of rodent motor cortex with an optical neural interface.

The beam of blue light down the canal!
Once upon a time, not that long ago, I visualized the energy of someone meditating on the idea of time. What I saw captivated me, humbling my breath to a silent standstill in awe of the wonder. The sensation and visualization of that experience entered my waking unconscious in a lucid dream, that I drew and wrote about at lengths upon waking. I must have written 3 or 4 poems circumscribing to the best of my ability what that experience was. The heart of the matter was a ribbed tunnel, a round blue sound, a beam of peace, neon, blue and infinite.
I read the linked article above and I cannot help but consider the connection between the blue light beam canal and what came to me during a visualization.
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Selective Attention Test

3 Aug

Sense the Invisible

// Well, Do You?

The process of analyzing the results and considering the application of four psychometric tests I took in a life planning course this summer has taken me back to my roots as a young and eager undergraduate psychology major. The video below is a staple in intro to psychology courses, I am sure, but it’s still fun none the less. Watch and see for yourself:

Interested? You are in luck: click on the picture below to visit the home page for this research, book and corresponding videos described in the book. Enjoy 🙂

The Invisible Gorilla

BeMused Design on Adobe’s Featured Blog Website!!

23 Jun

Thank you to any and all of those of you out there who have supported the energy I put into design -be they visual or ideological. BeMused was recently featured on Adobe’s design website as a Featured Blog. Check it out!

BeMused Featured on Adobe\’s Featured Blog Site

~Emily (Creator, BeMused Design)

Self Portrait Painting

22 Jun

“Free door” read the cardboard sign wilting and weathered against the blank white expression of the orphan item on the side of the road.

My motions followed through in this sequences: adoption, expression, capture a picture of the painting in progress, recreated the piece through a multiple exposure of that photograph with a graphic I designed of the eye of hours: a continuously evolving self-portrait that’s changed, change and changing.

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Neon Clock & Italian Peas

31 May

NEON CLOCK

OIL PAINT 1

ITALIAN PEAS

A Morning Mantra, Resolution:

26 May

I  will soar: I have faith in the belief in myself to soar.

Between 3:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. yesterday I was sitting, waiting, wandering at airports and in airplanes.

The transitional move  up the coast to Portland only took an afternoon. The transition took the entire afternoon. The transition smashed me like a sardine, packed between thousands of journeys and bags, time traveling on a jet-fueled conveyor belt through space. The transition was an insular experience, and until halfway through my second flight, I did not read a word or listen to music as I looked inside myself with compassion and processed the changes in attempt to iron out the sentimental wrinkles tensing my muscles, heart, chest and mind. Hard to concentrate.

All of the above are simultaneously true. When I finally did open the New York Times, I read the paper in a record time (for me), inhaling the source like water on a dry sponge in under an hour. There was an op-ed debate and letters to the editor that stuck a cord in me. There had been an earlier article on ‘Mediocrity in the Military Academies.’ The people’s response was touching. Midshipmen received support from all angles, and in their own way, the responses asserted the qualities that these young men and volunteers strive to serve their country in a time of war: loyalty, honor, ethical discipline, selflessness, and serving others.

Another Op-Ed article was a comparative analysis finding the common thread through world religious traditions. The uniting piece between and amongst them all: compassion for others like compassion for self.

An article in the Science Times section traced the genetic origins of corn, a crop that only exists today as a domesticated plant. Red eyed male Tree Frogs are the first vertebrae  discovered to use vibrations as a signal to other males as an aggressive statement of territoriality. A bacteria has been found to cause snow and rain.

The world is fascinating. and my curiosity and thirst to absorb all that I can surges through me. Every morning,  my resolution to myself is to repeat the mantra upon waking as a way to connect with the qualities and selfless compassion as true fuel and nourishment through this journey–

I  will soar: I have faith in the belief in myself to soar.

BeMused Graphic Design

16 Apr

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Science vs. Conscience

6 Apr

The Faraday paradox (or Faraday’s paradox) is an experiment that illustrates Michael Faraday‘s law of electromagnetic induction. Faraday deduced this law in 1831, after inventing the first electromagnetic generator or dynamo, but was never satisfied with his own explanation of the paradox.

The scientific method juxtaposes the very logic of the scientific method. Yet again, science proves truth, and science proves truth (simultaneously) false.

The scientific method is a strong, and more or less credible way to understand the state of now: for what we know, we do the best we can, in the process, of understanding, what we know, but have yet to concretely realize.

Albeit, Truth is Change. A testament to history and history’s testament exemplifies that, yes, Truth Changes.

Change, naked and alive, change alone and change–nothing more, forever more, no truth proves itself again legislative time and intentions:Truth IS Change.

And Change is Truth too.

Reciprocity is the good feeling generated in the exchange of equality: a flex and reflex with no splash, true to the nature of itself, truth, in the exchange, change in the exchange, that good true feeling.

Lost and Found Language (free write)

1 Apr

Syllabic leaks in the circus drain, turning rightly to tight and left lost and losing listeners to the volumes spoken in the simple echos marry morphing morphemes chain-link phoneme, a ringing wagging chasing its tail, rounding the rosy sinuous fluency spoken before word warped into blades of black magic.

Listen to the state of the sound. Sepia city signature dismal label Los Angeles, profoundly deaf and numb and plastic pillows billow in the atmosphere, over the eyes and ears and hearts of listeners chasing a diluted vision for  fulfillment.

Sounds are under water, sounds are an undercurrent of sub-conscious grenades. Manipulation of epic defense, mankind the great storyteller, mankind the wrangler of rhetoric, mankind who creates noise grinding gears grinding gears postulating answers sans questioning the question the quest is lost tossed to the wind, where are we now?

Found in a familiar place, afraid of being lost, clinging to comfort in fear of adventure, coating the lush oasis of land with grey hard cold cement to tentative to march, together, to tentative to step into unknown territory without a finger pointed to the institution who owns the deeds.

Where is truth now? What worth remains in the word? Granular metallic and granite, emerald and limestone gems founded in the meaning of sound, a sing-song system of semantic symbolism: would you recognize if you heard?

One universal language sounds like sound sounds like sound sounds like sound: would you recognize if you heard? One universal language resounds within us, what are the vibrations of consciousness if not sound, would you realize your reflection if it passed through you invisible and true?

Break form, allow and follow rhythm within and what could be is the way is intuitive, the internal compass rose knows and glows like love in warm light like a soliloquy  within and between one and one and zero sums one in forever, a recycling sound.

What’s in a word?

Sound.

What’s in a Sound?

The conscience realization of reverberation.

BeMused Graphic Designs: ImproVocations

28 Mar

Find more photos like this on FITC

Find more photos like this on FITC

Rabbit Hooligan

27 Mar


Syncin’ In

16 Mar

FACT: EARTHQUAKE.

FACT: STARTLED, SEARCHED ONLINE, NOTHING REPORTED, SO I REPORTED IT.

A 6 PAGE MINI SURVEY, AND FACT;

ONE MINUTE LATER I LOOK ON GOOGLE AGAIN AND SEE THE FOLLOWING REPORT–

Recent earthquakes:

  • Time: 9 minutes ago
  • Magnitude: 4.4
  • Location:  Greater Los Angeles area, California

FROM THE RESPONSES IN THE SURVEY I REPORTED TO THE GOVERNMENT,  CHECK OUT HOW ACCURATE MY SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSED THE MAGNITUDE OF THE SOURCE!

I AM VERY PROUD OF MY ACCURACY. AND IF I SHALL DIE IN MY SLEEP, I SHALL DIE ACCOMPLISHED AND in ξSYNCΦ ronization:

  • 
    
    Event ID: unknown
  • 
    
    Estimated intensity: IV
  • 
    
    ZIP code/postal area: 90007
  • 
    
    Event time: 4:08 AM
  • 
    
    Questionnaire complete.
  • Your information will be processed shortly.
  • Thank you for your contribution.

Tagging the Production of Culture

15 Mar

Quick–divert your eyes. Look up.

Do you see  the vice gripping the voice you express? Freedom of speech arguments assert the freedom for content and unadulterated, unregulated word choice–the content.

Open content is one form of freedom. There is no denying the importance of freedom of speech so far as content is concerned. However, the structure and function surrounding the content defines and determines how loudly and lasting expression of content, free as free can achieve, will ring.

Mediated Horizontal Mode of Communication.

Familiarize yourself with the term because this concept creates the carvernous walls insulating the free expression with inward echos: ringing, rung, hung in the air, faint and fading, whispering, stagnant, silent, feeble, falling and flattened intonation, dead. Fin.

One must know the limitation to cross the limitation into the new frontier. What is beyond the horizon is dependent upon our consciousness as one mind. Branch out, dance and sing: today is only as free as the conscious inertia we enacted yesterday.

The following list are the global tags, conglomerates of topics relevant the present as the present passes and future finds itself here once again:

Music News Life Politics Photography Art Travel Food EventsPoetry Fashion Family Personal Writing Movies Entertainment Books Video Videos LoveThoughts Random Religion Culture Media Photos Technology Reviews Education Recipes Health SportsRogers park Blog Film Inspiration History Humor Business Friends Design People Social Media Home ChristianityPhilosophy Faith Articles Science Economy Nature Relationships Work 60626 School Review Marketing BloggingGovernment 49th Ward Updates Musings Television Journal Misc Announcements Reflections Miscellaneous Cooking EnvironmentSpirituality TV Fine Art Current Events Photo Quotes Women God Poems Russian Fun Fiction Community Opinion 2010 Internet AllRogers Park Chamber of Commerce Research Other Economics Health Care Pictures] Human Rights Rants Commentary IslamArchitecture Random Thoughts Animals Beauty Lifestyle Leadership Games Stories USA Ramblings Comedy Parenting Literature Diary IndiaMy Life Style Corruption China Photo Galleries Europe Quest Network Services Society Church Children Shopping Theology Israel RunningAmerica Nutrition Book Reviews Spiritual Real Estate Me Projects Links Funny Obama Sex Kids Linux Journalism Event Sport Interviews JapanJustice Software Training Daily life Celebrities English

EXPLORING THE BRAIN’S ROLE IN CREATIVITY

2 Jan

SAN DIEGO—Being one of the true geniuses of the modern era, Albert Einstein recognized that a useful method for understanding the brain’s role in creativity was to study the brains of highly creative people. He also realized that there would be a great deal of interest in examining his own brain after his death, so he willed that his brain be removed before cremation. However, nearly all of the 240 blocks into which Einstein’s brain was dissected were lost and never analyzed.
Thirty years later, the Brodmann’s area 39 portion of Einstein’s brain was analyzed histologically by Marian C. Diamond, PhD, and colleagues. They reported that this area of Einstein’s brain contained a higher proportion of glial cells versus neurons, compared with the brains of control subjects. Assuming that the paucity of cortical neurons was not the result of aging (the control subjects were significantly younger than Einstein at the time of his death), how did the loss of neurons relate to Einstein’s creative genius?

When Einstein was about age 3, his parents brought him to a pediatrician because he was not yet talking. Researchers have learned that Einstein had developmental dyslexia. More than a century ago, it was found that lesions of the left angular gyrus—ie, Brodmann’s area 39—induce acquired alexia. Therefore, it is possible that people with developmental dyslexia may also have abnormalities in this region, Kenneth M. Heilman, MD, suggested in his lecture at the 17th Annual Meeting of the American Neuropsychiatric Association. In his view, however, the high ratio of glial cells to neurons that was reported by Diamond et al was less a sign of Einstein’s dyslexia than an indication of the high degree of what Dr. Heilman refers to as “connectivity.”

After viewing photographs taken of Einstein’s brain before its dissection in 1955, Witelson and colleagues noted that Einstein had an enlarged left inferior and—unlike most human beings—undivided parietal lobe, suggesting that this bigger and more highly connected supramodal cortex gave Einstein an advantage in doing mathematics and spatial computations. In 1985, Geschwind and Galaburda posited that delay in the development of the left hemisphere of the brain may allow the right hemisphere, which mediates spatial computations, to become highly specialized. It was Einstein’s view that his own creativity was heavily dependent on spatial reasoning. Thus, the abnormal development of his left hemisphere may have led to the right hemisphere becoming highly specialized for spatial computations, Dr. Heilman theorized.

“If you have something going on in one side of the brain, [could] that ‘disinhibit’ the other side of the brain [into] developing even greater ability?” Dr. Heilman asked. “Could Einstein’s dyslexia and lack of development of his left hemisphere have allowed his right hemisphere to grow and be well connected and to have excellent modules?… People who have tremendous creativity also have tremendous connectivity.”

FINDING THE THREAD THAT UNITES

According to Dr. Heilman, who is the James E. Rooks, Jr, Distinguished Professor of Neurology and Health Psychology at the University of Florida’s College of Medicine in Gainesville, connectivity is a key component of “creative innovation,” a concept that combines two of the four stages of creativity—incubation and illumination (the others are preparation and verification)—identified by Hermann Helmholtz in 1826.

In an article titled “Creative Innovation: Possible Brain Mechanisms” appearing in Neurocase in 2003, Dr. Heilman and his colleagues, Stephen E. Nadeau, MD, and David O. Beversdorf, MD, defined creative innovation as “the ability to understand and express novel orderly relationships.” A high level of general intelligence, domain-specific knowledge, and special skills are necessary for creative innovation, but even when they coincide, these three components are not sufficient for creative innovation. One further crucial component is the ability to develop alternative solutions—otherwise known as “divergent thinking”—yet, even the coexistence of specialized knowledge and divergent thinking is not enough to enable an individual to find the thread that unites the two.

“Finding this thread might require the binding of different forms of knowledge, stored in separate cortical modules that have not been previously associated,” the authors wrote. “Thus, creative innovation might require the coactivation and communication between regions of the brain that ordinarily are not strongly connected.”

Based on the findings of anatomic studies, it appears that creative individuals such as Einstein may have alterations of specific regions of the brain’s posterior neocortical region. At the same time, it has been observed that creative innovation frequently takes place during times of diminished arousal (eg, sleep) and that many well-known creative people have experienced depression, suggesting that alterations of such neurotransmitters as norepinephrine might play a critical role in creativity. In the view of Dr. Heilman and his coauthors, highly creative individuals “may be endowed with brains that are capable of storing extensive specialized knowledge in their temporoparietal cortex, be capable of frontal mediated divergent thinking, and have a special ability to modulate the frontal lobe-locus coeruleus (norepinephrine) system, such that during creative innovation cerebral levels of norepinephrine diminish, leading to the discovery of novel orderly relationships.”

In his lecture and in a follow-up interview with NeuroPsychiatry Reviews, Dr. Heilman focused on the importance of divergent thinking in creative innovation, how our understanding of its neurobiologic underpinnings has evolved over the past two centuries, and the clinical implications of depression and other brain disorders for future neuropharmacologic treatments.

“To be creative, people need to break away from what they have been taught to believe, and thus divergent thinking is a critical element of creativity,” he said. “Patients who have their frontal lobe[s] removed or injured cannot perform divergent thinking…. The major hypothesis of this talk is that creativity is dependent upon the ability to diverge and then form innovative solutions.

“The development of innovative solutions is dependent on the ability to coactivate anatomically distinct representational networks that store different forms of knowledge. This simultaneous distributed activation … may allow people to develop alternative innovative solutions, thereby finding the thread that unites.”

ENCOURAGING CREATIVITY BY FOSTERING INDEPENDENT THINKING

Dr. Heilman cited several items that are important for clinicians to know to get a handle on current research into creativity and the brain. Besides the importance of both divergent and “convergent” thinking, he observed that “many people who are very creative have a higher incidence of mood and addiction disorders [and that while] many neurologic disorders can reduce creativity … there are some that might enhance creativity.”

As an example of the latter, he cited the work of Miller and colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco, describing a series of patients with frontotemporal dementia who acquired new artistic abilities despite evidence of deterioration in the left anterior temporal lobe (see NeuroPsychiatry Reviews, June 2003, page 1). “These are people who had no history of artistic production,” Dr. Heilman said. “They actually became creative—perhaps because the deterioration on the left side ‘disinhibited’ their right side, and the right side got creative doing artistic things.”

Regarding mood and addiction disorders, Dr. Heilman explored the links among creativity and sleep, dreaming, rest and relaxation, and depression, and observed that one thread uniting them all is changes in neurotransmitter systems. Two components indispensable to divergent thinking appear to be disengagement and the ability to develop alternative solutions. To arrive at a creative solution to a persistently unsolvable problem, an individual must often change the method by which he or she has already attempted to solve the problem—in other words, think outside the box. Observations on problem solving have included William James’ view, expressed in 1890, that the ability to switch strategies is integral to divergent thinking and Charles Spearman’s suggestion in 1931 that creativity results from bringing together two or more ideas that previously have been isolated. One way to solve a persistent problem, then, would be to see it in a “new light” by combining different forms of knowledge and cognitive strategies mediated by the two hemispheres of the brain.

Dr. Heilman cited as examples a number of scientists who reported solving a difficult scientific problem while asleep or when falling asleep or awakening from sleep. He also pointed to the association between creativity and novelty seeking and the high rates of alcoholism, drug abuse, bipolar depression, and monodepression among such creative types as writers, composers, musicians, and fine artists. Based on what is known from existing evidence, such associations raise more questions than answers, according to Dr. Heilman. “For example, does treatment of depression and bipolar disorder influence creativity, and what are the effects of different treatments?” he asked.

PROMOTING CREATIVE THINKING

Can creativity in individuals be encouraged regardless of the makeup of their brain, or are we limited by such factors as the number of glial cells and amount of white matter? “I believe creativity can be ‘encouraged,’” Dr. Heilman responded. “We have known for decades that when young rodents are put in a stimulating environment, they have a much richer neural network than their sibs who were not raised in this environment. Thus, bringing up children in an enriched environment and making certain that they receive a good education is critical for their brain development.

“The frontal lobes appear to be the part of the cortex that is most important for creativity, in that they are critical for divergent thinking and might modulate the coactivation of diverse cognitive networks so important in innovation. The means by which family and friends might be able to encourage the development of the frontal lobes is to encourage independent and divergent thinking.”

Apart from such sociocultural interventions, Dr. Heilman believes that there is a limit to the extent to which neuropsychiatry and neuroscience can enhance creativity, particularly with regard to the development of new neuropharmacologic treatments. “It is possible that certain drugs taken by people might enhance creativity and others inhibit creativity,” he said, citing an editorial titled “Cosmetic Neurology,” written by one of his former fellows, Anjan Chatterjee. “But physicians have learned that ‘when it is not broke, do not attempt to fix it.’ In other words, if you alter a person’s homeostasis, there might be a price paid.”

—Fred Balzac

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